Migrant Workers Saved my Life

Some zines are meant to entertain their readers; some offend, many challenge and then there are those that inform, like this one.

Migrant Workers sets out to dismantle the systemic and social racism that the author feels still permeates our communities. To borrow Kate’s succinct explanation, “I want this cycle of racism & ignorance toward migrant workers to stop. I don’t want to see another generation of children grow up being taught to fear these valued members of our community.” The half-size, 22-page zine starts off with an introduction of how Kate initially got involved with the Caribbean Workers Outreach Project, an organization that helps coordinate church services and social events for Caribbean workers. One summer evening in 2004, her family invited a worker for dinner, as he hadn’t had a break all day. She hasn’t looked back since. “You know those decisions that alter your life course, but looking back on it you think, I could have so easily missed that?” Kate writes in the zine.

Long story short, Kate and her family got actively involved in the lives of the Caribbean community, so much so that they even make the effort to visit Jamaica to see the workers’ families. The zine is a testament to the people she’s met along the way and every page is dedicated to someone.

Each photocopied page has a patterned background, with blocks of type and various pictures and drawings overlaying it. Really, for photocopying, Kate did a fantastic job laying it out–the pages are organized and the pictures are clear. It emits the warmth of an old scrapbook and because of this, you get to reminisce in her memories as if they’re your own. Well done. (Amy Greenwood)

Perzine, Kate Andres-Toal, communikate@ riseup.net, opirgbrock.org/node/75

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