Kill the Robot

MacDonald’s first crack at the graphic novel wields a cold hard punch. What little warmth it holds is from protagonist Moore White’s fleeting memories of more human times. But this chill is strangely enchanting, especially when accompanied by tormented sketches. These seem to be derived from a genetically modified youthful angst spliced with technological futuristic doom. MacDonald takes these two states and slowly and painstakingly mashes them together, exposing our collective conscience and worst fears. We witness Moore’s world turn to shit as “Esoft,” a Microsoft type entity takes over, check points are established, punks become extinct, people become robots, and she drinks in the damage of nuclear accidents in Russia. The smooth switch between pages of conspiracy laden futuristic techno-doom and the warm recollections of disenfranchised youth illustrate MacDonald is one smart and multi-spiced cookie. Given that her calendar has been filled with her very own rock opera, performances with multiple bands, lecturing, political rabble rousing, and publishing a zine, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that she can pull off a graphic novel successfully, as well. (heze douglas)

by Maggie MacDonald, $19.95, 118 pgs, McGilligan Books, P.O. Box 16024, 1260 Dundas St. W., Toronto, ON, M6J 3W2, mcgilliganbooks.com

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