Zine Review: Everyday Failures – A Punk Stuck in Suburbia

Every Day Failures

Zine, Sarah B., Punch Drunk Press (new edition) pioneerspress.com, $4

Immediately after zinemaker Sarah B’s ex-boyfriend Matt leaves her and her two daughters behind, the trio leave their punk collective house to live in Sarah’s aunt’s sprawling home for two months. Struggling with newly single motherhood, the frustrations of raising two very young children (both in their toddler phrase of life), growing poverty, bureaucratic hoops for food stamps, loneliness, and the conflicting feelings of being a punk parent in a suburban haven, Sarah tries to keep a smiling face on for her daughters throughout everything.

Sarah presents Everyday Failures as an extremely honest account of her conflicting emotions while staying in a very bourgeoisie living situation, filled to the brim with tempting luxuries and endless hours of free cable. This is coupled with her mounting depression of missing Matt, and feeling exhausted. The zine is primarily comprised of text, with some images peppered throughout to drive certain points home, such as a picture of a happy pregnant couple in the beginning few pages where she discusses hers and Matt’s idealistic “its takes a village” thoughts of how raising a child in a punk collective house would be.

Throughout the zine, the reader can feel Sarah’s frustrations when her children are feeling fussy, or how much she feels judged by government workers who are responsible for deciding if she’s eligible for food stamps. Everyday Failures is relatable and very well drawn picture of Sarah’s situation during this time, making it a definite must read for those who have ever felt out of place when thrown into a new situation and forced to climb uphill. (Richelle Charkot)

72

x
4
Posts Remaining