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Toronto Art Book Fair Preview: Killer Acid

In anticipation of the upcoming Toronto Art Book Fair (June 15-18), we’re previewing some exciting artists to look out for! Here’s one to get you started.

Killer Acid, a.k.a. Rob Corradetti, is a publishing imprint based in New York City whose self-described style is a “blend of head shop and punk rock.” Specializing in screen prints, tees, comics, and “psychedelic ephemera,” Corradetti’s work has been linked with a variety of bands, including Thee Oh Sees, Wiz Khalifa, Mac Demarco, Alvvays, and The Black Lips.

Read more: Toronto Art Book Fair Preview: Killer Acid

Calls for submissions: Springtime rush!

image via Queer Indigenous Girl on etsy

Call for Entries: queer indigenous girl

queer indigenous girl is a zine by and for black, indigenous, people of color (BIPoC) who are queer, trans, 2-spirit, non-binary, disabled, neurodivergent and chronically ill. QIG is now accepting submissions including art, poetry, photography, comics, short essays & fiction, etc. Deadline is May 31.

Call for Submissions: Cliterature Feminism Issue

The last issue of Cliterature was themed around patriarchy, so it makes sense that this next issue, deadline May 30. More deets here.

Call for entries: Hourglass International Writing Contest

Hourglass Literary MAgazine is accepting poems, essays, and short stories for its yearly contest. The deadline has been extended to May 31st, and you could win up to a $1000 and a “clepsydra” whatever that is.

Call for Submissions: Lyme Disease Charity Art Book

This compilation book about Lyme disease or any other tick-borne illness is accepting submissions by people affected by those illnesses, whether you were sick or someone you love has experienced it. Any kidn of art — digital, mixed media, writing — is accepted. Deadline to apply is June 15th!

Call for Submissions: Bibliophile/Homophile Queer and Transgender Publishing Cultures (UAAC – AUUC Conference)

Wanna talk about gay zines? Submit to present at this conference and maybe you’ll get flown to Banff?? Pretty sure that’s how it works. But actually this event looks cool, not sure how the whole “academic” thing goes.

Call for Entries: Elyse Wolf Prize

Submit your chapbooks to slate Roof Press’ annual contest and you can win $500 and become a member of the (very cool) press! Here’s more information.

 Calls for Submissions/Collaborators: Welcome Chaos as Change Zine

The creator of WCAC describes it as “a loose collection of automatic writing, recontextualised  web content, editorial, photography, argument, confusion and anxiety.” They’re looking for some more people to contribute now that they’re on their 4th edition. Check out the blog to get a better sense of what the zine is all about:

Call for Submissions: Anathema

Are you a queer POC and also write spec? Then check out Anathema — it pays! They’re accepting submissions until the end of may, including fiction and non-fiction. Check out their submissions page:

Calls for Submissions: The Wanderer

I’m just going to put their call for submissions verbatim because it’s so good: “WE ARE THE WANDERER, A LITERARY WEBSITE COMMITTED TO PUBLISHING THE WORK OF ARTISTS WHOSE LENS ISN’T THE STRAIGHT, WHITE, CIS MALE ONE THAT DOMINATES OUR CULTURE. IF YOU ARE QUEER, TRANS, NON-BINARY, A PERSON OF COLOR, A WOMAN, DISABLED; IF YOU’RE A BEGINNING WRITER OR AN EXPERIENCED ONE, THE WANDERER WANTS TO READ YOUR WORK. WE REFUSE TO BE AFRAID OF FASCISTS, RACISTS, TROLLS AND THE WHITE SUPREMACIST CAPITALIST PATRIARCHY IN GENERAL. WE ARE HERE. WE WILL FIGHT. SEND US SOME WORK (4-8 POEMS OR 5,000 WORDS IS FINE) AT WANDERERPOEMS@GMAIL.COM”

Staff Pick: Robin Ha’s Cook Korean!

Earlier this week, the Korean boyband Bangtan Boys (BTS) won for Top Social Artist at the 2017 Billboard Music Awards. Even if the Billboards are not your thing, you may have caught the super racist responses to their win on social media (like super racist. A quick Twitter search of #BBMA can get you up to speed).

BTS’s win revealed two things:

— South Korean culture has a huge global presence and

— As a collective, we can be embarrassingly unaware of our racism.

 

Read more: Staff Pick: Robin Ha’s Cook Korean!

Book Review: Ethereal Voices

Ethereal Voices: A Collection of Short Stories and Poems, Shona Jabang, , lulu.com, $20.76

Ethereal Voices is a collection of poems, essays, and short stories set in Jamaica, England, the US, and The Gambia.

It opens with “Sister, Sister” where a young Pearl’s enchanted relationship with her mother is ruined by the birth of her sister, and she is left behind in Jamaica as her parents migrate to England. It anchors the book, exploring primordial emotions, complex family dynamics, and how citizens (victims) of colonialism are often reduced to marching around the world in search of “something better.”

The most notable story is “The Dream” in which a 13-year-old girl, whose mother had her at age 11 and mysteriously abandoned her, is sleepwalking and taken by her grandmother to see the obeah man, unraveling a horrifying family secret.

Read more: Book Review: Ethereal Voices

Interview: Bombay Underground and Zine Cultures in India


Zine culture is unique in every city, with new zine fairs emerging so quickly, and in so many cities and towns that it’s hard to keep up.

They’ve also emerged with different themes, whether they be identity specific zine fairs like the Toronto Queer Zine Fair, Bay Area Queer Zine Fair, feminist zine fairs in Hamilton, Philly, and New York, or the Brown Paper Zine Fair for people of colour in New York and Baltimore.

Recently, we caught wind of a new series of zine events in India thrown by a collective of artists called Bombay Underground. In January of 2017, the first ever Bombay Zine Fest was held in Mumbai (Bombay), bringing together a large volume of self published books and zines for the public for the first time ever in India.

The same organizers went on to organize a travelling exhibition of zines called “You Deserve to DIY.” They’re currently in the process of setting up a permanent zine library, and they need some help from zine makers and fans all over the world — check out their crowdfunding campaign here!  You can also find them on Facebook and Instagram, at Bombay Underground and Dharavi Art Room

We caught up with organizers Himanshu and Aqui over email about zine culture in India and the experience of organizing such a festival.

Zines have a long history in many parts of the world – what is the zine culture like in Mumbai, and how long has it existed?

Aqui : There is a rich history of self publishing in india. Various social justice movements often make easily distributable small publications. Annihilation of Caste by B.R. Ambedkar was one such books, which has now become an extremely important book about caste politics in India.

While there are various artists and designers making art books, which they sometimes even call zines, I think the first people in Bombay to actually make zines and hustle them in the streets was Bombay Underground.

Read more: Interview: Bombay Underground and Zine Cultures in India

Comic Review: Rat

Rat
Comic, Chelsea Bellrose, 20 pgs., chelseabellrose.com
We don’t often consider the mortality we share with our rat neighbors and co-habitants. I suspect they don’t think of it much either. We’re both so busy. Jobs to do, buses to catch, nests to build, pizza to drag through the subway station. And yet from dust we both came and to dust we shall both return. Chelsea Bellrose indulges thoughts like these in the wordless comic Rat.
The comic is black and white. The cover is in colour, with the

Read more: Comic Review: Rat